Print Page | Close Window

MSA Arabic

Printed From: FSI Language Courses
Category: Learning Languages
Forum Name: Arabic
Forum Discription: Discussion about studying Arabic using the FSI course.
URL: http://fsi-language-courses.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=242
Printed Date: 16 January 2009 at 2:36am


Topic: MSA Arabic
Posted By: Deniz
Subject: MSA Arabic
Date Posted: 20 December 2006 at 3:12pm
Does any of the fellow members own or have acces to the FSI MSA Arabic course? It would be the basic stone for the whole arabic language section as the majority of learners begin with the MSA. Thank you all contributors anyway- this site is offering the opportunity to learn more obscure languages even to people from the countries, where no sources for such languages are available.



Replies:
Posted By: daristani
Date Posted: 20 December 2006 at 4:30pm
I agree that it would be nice to have the FSI MSA course available on the site, but it's not really a basic language course the way most of the other FSI courses are.  Here's part of a post I wrote about it on the "How to Learn Any Language" site some months ago:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The MSA course is (...) unlike any other FSI course of which I'm aware. It's all in Arabic script (except for the vocabulary listings) and thus presupposes that the learner has already learned the Arabic alphabet. It introduces a very few words at a time, then gives lots of sentences using these words, which are read on the tapes. These sentences tend to e very similar to one another, with only a word or two varying, at least in the first few lessons. There's no speaking, unless you want to repeat after the voice on the tape, and there are no drills per se. In essence, I think its best use is to develop listening and reading comprehension of Modern Standard Arabic on typical journalistic topics. It's thus useful for, say, a political officer in an embassy or consulate who wants to gain greater comprehension for written and spoken journalistic Arabic, but probably will not be of overmuch help in terms of developing conversational ability. There are no dialogues, but rather lots of typical newspaper (or television news report) sentences. In short, I think it's excellent for certain specific purposes, especially for developing comprehension and practicing news-related vocabulary, but it's not a course to learn to speak Arabic from.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
That said, I recall that there was an effort underway a number of months ago to digitize the MSA materials as well and eventually make them available.  I have no idea when they might become available, if at all, but think that most learners of Arabic would probably do better to start with the Saudi Basic Course in any event, given the rather specific focus of the MSA course.  The Saudi course is the only FSI Arabic program of which I'm aware that's even remotely conversational in nature.


Posted By: onebir
Date Posted: 21 December 2006 at 6:30am
Originally posted by daristani

IThe Saudi course is the only FSI Arabic program of which I'm aware that's even remotely conversational in nature.


It seems there was also a 'FAST' course.  It doesn't seem to be available from NTIS, but Georgetown Uni Press publish a USD40 book/Mp3 CD based on it: http://www.press.georgetown.edu/detail.html?id=1589010604 - http://www.press.georgetown.edu/detail.html?id=1589010604

(see the link to the preface - bottom of page - for the FSI connection)

There's also a free non-FSI course in Syrian Arabic, including around 3 hours of audio, online here:
http://www.syrianarabic.com/ - http://www.syrianarabic.com/

(Let us know if what they're like if you try them)


Posted By: Poetry
Date Posted: 12 March 2007 at 8:41pm
Gmut is right, if a bit testy. I'll verify things before posting from now on.

After two decades, my own skills and rememberances are just faulty. I should know better.
--Poetry


Posted By: gmut
Date Posted: 13 March 2007 at 10:03am
I strongly disagree with the post as to the similarity between MSA and Maghrebi. I happen to have gathered original dialect material from Tunisian and Moroccan Arabic, and these two dialects are so far from MSA that Arabs from other parts of the Arab world are unable to understand them. Arabs from the Maghreb region have to speak in MSA with other Arabs in order to make themselves understood. The Hijazi dialect of Saudi Arabia is indeed close to MSA but not the Maghrebi dialects, and so is Levantine Arabic in terms of vocabulary, whereas Egyptian Arabic might be closer to MSA in terms of grammar and pronounciation, with the exception of the "g" sound they use for jiim.
 
Gmut


Posted By: patuco
Date Posted: 16 March 2007 at 4:28pm
I agree with gmut. I know an Egyptian who prefers to speak in English rather than Arabic when speaking to Moroccans.


Posted By: Poetry
Date Posted: 25 April 2007 at 10:47pm
Yep.  I confused Hijazi with Maghrebi.  Maghreb = Morrocco = almost unintelligible from MSA.  Hijazi = Saudi = really close to MSA.  My bad.  I apologize.  It's been forever since I worked in this language.

I learned at DLI from an Egyptian instructor.  While Egyptian might be close to MSA, I can tell you that it's not the hard 'g' sound that throws your ear off.  It's all of those glottal stops that would get thrown in.  In odd places.  Often.  Really throws the ear off.  When our Instructor would say something to us in Egyptian dialect, you could see the blank stares around the room followed by one of us hesitantly making a reply of some sort.

I took the Syrian/Jordanian/Lebanese dialect course at DLI after MSA, but never saw or heard it again once I left.  From the little I remember, it was MSA-like with truncated endings and French words scattered throughout it.  A lot of French words.  (At least, that's what stuck in my memory.  I can't trust my memory of the Syrian dialect at all.)

 
I graduated and worked during the Iran-Iraq War.  That wasn't pretty, wasn't fun, and I sincerely pitied both sides of that misbegotten conflict.  I was well out of the US military and the Arabic language by the time the Gulf War broke out.  I stored my books in the attic.  For almost 20 years.  My spoken Arabic has degenerated to the basic smattering of Iraqi dialect pattered on what I'd learned.  (There was a point where I'd actually written ghazals in Arabic, but I could not read them anymore.  Though I still knew the basics of what they meant because I'd written them.)  Basically it was a case of 'just don't want to know this, so I won't anymore.'  That was a really nasty war --I still have nightmares sometimes.  (I wished many, many times that I'd been a Chinese linguist instead of an Arabic one.)

 
Then my brother-in-law got called up to take a year long vacation in Iraq in 2004.  While he was there, he asked me for help getting language materials because they weren't able to get them from their own command.  I bought the MSA and Iraqi courses from DLI.  And started digitizing them for him. 
 
A week after I'd started, he returned home injured and was later boarded out.  My digitization effort ended at lesson 8 in the course and stayed there till recently. 

 
There are about 100 tapes and 143 lessons in this course.  The copy of the MSA course that DLI sent me in 2004 did not include the Sound and Script set.  That's about a 2 week intro course on the letters and writing system and SATS (Standard Arabic Translation System).  I still have the workbooks for that from my original set, but I wrote in them, of course.  I turned the tapes in at the end of the sessions, so I don't have those anymore.  The DLI MSA course is pretty useful if you don't know any Arabic, but it does require that you understand the sound and script part. 
 
With any luck, we should know in a couple of months the status of these courses.  Once I get the copyright status cleared, I'll hand them off to gdfellows to post.  And at the rate that I'm digitizing, I should be almost done with MSA by then.  Except for maybe the scanning which seems to be the longer part of this effort. 

I also have both the Iraqi dialect and Syrian dialect courses.  They have about 75 tapes in each one also.  They're not meant to be stand-alone courses, but enhancements after you already know MSA.  They start out immediately in dialogues on social situations, etc.  I've only started digitizing the Iraqi course so far, but I'll get to the Syrian eventually. 
--Poetry


Posted By: daristani
Date Posted: 26 April 2007 at 5:37am
Poetry, thanks very much for your persistence in all of this work.  The DLI materials, based on your description, must be truly unique in their extent, and since they were never marketed the way the FSI courses were, copies are probably exceedingly hard to come by. 

So you're a very unique resource both in your having the materials and in your monumental efforts to make them available.   You'll have a number of people very, very much in your debt when you finish this effort.  Shukran jaziilan!


Posted By: mantis
Date Posted: 02 May 2007 at 7:59am
Please let me know if you need help digitizing any of your materials.  I have a professional dubbing machine and would be to donate my time to the cause. 


Posted By: Anatoli
Date Posted: 15 May 2007 at 1:30am
Hi,

I am new to this forum. :)

I will follow for any updates on MSA course availability.


-------------
Анатолий - أناتولي - 阿纳托利 - アナトーリー


Posted By: mtlewis
Date Posted: 02 March 2008 at 1:13am
To all concerned,

I have the DLI MSA course (about two years worth of instruction) with audio and PDFs of everything, from Sound and Script to Third Semester. It is comprehensive. A marine I know took the course in 2002 and digitized the whole thing on two DVDs. If you really want it, let me know, I will try to send you the copies digitally (maybe a torrent, or something). It's huge, about 4 gigs.

You can use the DLI course to learn Arabic from English (if you are serious) in about a year if you study four to six hours a day. At about six months into your studies, I would recommend listening to and reading BBC Arabic online. Before you begin anything, you will need Hans Wehr's Dictionary of Arabic, arranged by root, and a pocket Arabic - English version of the Al Mawrid, arranged alphabetically, both available online:

http://www.amazon.com/Arabic-English-Dictionary-Modern-Written-Arabic/dp/0879500034/ref=pd_sim_b_img_2

http://www.amazon.com/Al-Mawrid-Al-Quareeb-English-Dictionary/dp/995390202X

The Google Language translation site may also help, but do not depend on it. You must learn the three letter root system (Wehr) to really understand MSA.

Okay, now, once you are proficient with MSA, you need to get up on a dialect, because you really don't know Arabic yet (!).   I recommend Pimsleur Eastern or Egyptian Arabic, or one of the courses I've seen posted here to familiarize yourself with speaking a dialect. Go through the course as fast as you can, then try to get in that country for about six months in an immersion environment, e.g., live with a host family if you can. (I would prefer a place like Syria as the Egyptian dialect doesn't travel as well in my opinion.)

Total time is about two to three years to fluency if you are really, really dedicated.

Fimanallah,

Marcus


Posted By: DemiPuppet
Date Posted: 02 March 2008 at 6:50am
Has it been established that the MSA course is in the public domain?

Edit
I see all the texts are available as PDFs on ERIC (though almost unreadable). The MSA course is possibly in the public domain.


Posted By: mtlewis
Date Posted: 02 March 2008 at 12:39pm
To all concerned,

I will try to post it today. I will leave it up for a week. A

Bear in mind, if anyone from the DoD or US Government asks me to take it down, I will certainly do this, if I am able. I don't see how the work paid for by US taxpayers could be considered copyright, but you never know.

The soldiers who worked on this created embedded links in the PDFs. They are exceedingly useful.
If you already understand a little Arabic, you will be more successful with this course than others. A good way to familiarize yourself with Arabic sufficiently is to take the first unit of the online Rosetta Stone course. Rosetta has a monthly subscription option that is very affordable.

And again, if you don't have a good dictionary, especially the Wehr, and the Mawrid, don't bother.


Good Luck,

Marcus


Posted By: mtlewis
Date Posted: 02 March 2008 at 1:42pm
This is the Azureus Magnet link:

magnet:?xt=urn:btih:IYRRPVDIYWDWOLVBVJ3OSKEK4AL4SMPR

I'm pretty much a newbie as far as torrents go, so let me know if this works.

M


Posted By: Poetry
Date Posted: 03 March 2008 at 9:12pm
Hi Demi,
I've been meaning to catch everyone up for a while. I know that I've been out of touch. (Bought a house, fixing old one up for sale/rent as fast as possible, and in late August I started working 70+ hour work weeks, plus, I have a toddler at home. I've kinda been insanely busy. Life is getting much better now.)

In July 2007, I had some conversations with several individuals. DLI's official stance is "we don't know what is in the public domain and what is not because we didn't keep records of that sort of thing. If you want to post it, do so, but put some sort of statement that basically explains that you think this is in the public domain because it's a government created work, but if you hold copyright, let me know and I'll take it down." One of the contacts was actually going to use this site as an example in a briefing that she was giving to higher brass about why the government should bother keeping records about copyrights. Given that they are posting certain things on ERIC now, I would say that perhaps some of it has finally started jarring loose. Probably as a direct result of that meeting that she had.

I have heard conflicting stories about the DLI Japanese and Chinese courses. The Japanese was licensed, I think. Part of the Chinese was also licensed from Yale (but only a small part of it....like the conversation drills. I'll have to look up the notes I took on this.)

The Arabic course from the 1978-1983 time frame was basically created at DLI by DLI instructors. I knew several of the voices on the tapes, and they were hired to create the course and teach Arabic. The main Arabic course was created by a fellow who later wrote a couple of textbooks about Arabic.

ERIC is not strictly public domain. It's labeled as "for education use only" non-profit. However, if you are seeing it on ERIC, and they are loading in a lot of DLI stuff lately, then it is pretty safe to say that it is public domain stuff. This site, which is offering it only as not for profit use, could also be argued that it is covered under that for education use only codicil.

Strictly speaking, it's probably just as safe to put up the DLI courses as it is to put up the FSI courses. It's exactly the same risk.

If Marc has the MSA basic course digitized already, I'll concentrate on digitizing the Syrian and Iraqi dialects.

Just out of curiousity, did the sound-and-script course also show up on ERIC? Or just the language books? DLI did not ship me the sound-and-script course as part of the MSA basic package. Either they had run out, or it wasn't available because of copyright. I'm unsure how to gauge.

Plus, DLI sold me the MSA basic, Iraqi & Syrian dialect courses straight up. They didn't always do that with every course. Things under copyright were not sold. To my knowledge, Japanese was never sold, but Chinese was sold.

--Poetry


Posted By: DemiPuppet
Date Posted: 03 March 2008 at 10:32pm
Poetry -

Even though I believe the MSA works are possibly in the public domain, it may not strictly matter. Now that the government has made all 20 of the  texts freely available, even if the works were still copyrighted, any claims of actual damage would therefore be zero.  Worst case would be that the material would need to be removed from the site.  Thus one could assert that the MSA texts are "effectively" in the public domain. The sound files are not part of ERIC. This is the version of the MSA courses created in 1975 - 1976. There is also an MSA Basic course created in the mid 60's, but that doesn't have any PDF files posted.

It looks like the Japanese text was licensed but that the audio was produced by the FSI.  An old 1980 GSA catalog directly sold the audio tapes for Beginning Japanese parts 1 and 2, but gave the address and phone number for purchasing the texts from "Yale University Press". Similarily the catalog sold tapes for "Course in Urdu" and "Urdu Newspaper Reader", but directed the purchaser to "Spoken Language Services" for purchasing the texts.

The Chinese course is strange. Only the first module has a copyright registered at the copyright office. But the text in the ERIC PDF is missing the notice. Both a registration and notice is needed to keep the book out of the public domain. The 1980 and 1985  GSA catalogs list all the Chinese modules for sale.

The only DLI courses I could find sold to the public were listed in the 1985 catalog:
  1. French for Belgium - Headstart
  2. German - Headstart
  3. Spanish for Latin America - Headstart
  4. Spanish for Spain - Headstart
Italian - Headstart  was added  in 1988.  Since these were definitely published before 1989, they would be in the public domain if they lack a copyright notice (I checked; they lack the notice). If it could be proven that other  DLI courses were sold or made available to the general public before 1989 and also lacked a copyright notice, they would be in the public domain (OK - actually the author gets 5 years after publication to register with the copyright office).


Posted By: TheBigZaboon
Date Posted: 04 March 2008 at 4:11am
Hello, everyone. The Big Zaboon here.
 
I want to add a few things to the discussion. First, let me say that I would like to see the DLI materials on the site as much, if not more than, anyone. But I think that the copyright argument that has been going on here for a  long time may just be missing the mark a bit. I am not criticizing, just commenting, so please don't be offended.
 
The discussion has centered around whether or not US government materials are in the public domain, and that is all well and good. We are all benefitting from the conclusion that the FSI materials, with Japanese being the major exception, are in the public domain, and so are safe to post on this site. Poetry has talked to DLI administrators, and they have exhibited a kind of benign ignorance about the whole subject. Everybody at FSI and at DLI seem to want the less commonly taught languages to be more widely available, so they are willing to look the other way. However, depending on the language, and how the material was developed (meaning developed by private contractors, or developed using existing components under special license), there may be non-governmental people who feel, rightly or wrongly, that they have some claim to these materials, and who may not be willing to allow them to be distributed so freely.
 
From here, I will restrict my comments to the two languages I know a little bit about, in this case, Japanese and Chinese Mandarin.
 
First, Japanese. My understanding is that some DLI materials in Japanese were developed with Brigham Young University, but that was a longtime ago. The FSI materials developed by E. H. Jordan may or may not have been developed during her term at FSI, but they are still being reworked and marketed today by students and academic (if not business) associates of Ms. Jordan. I met some of these people, including Ms. Jordan, nearly 20 years ago, and they gave off a very palpable sense of pride and ownership in their materials. And rightly so. At the time, those materials were about the only professional-level stuff around in Japanese.
 
I don't know what their reaction might be to some version of the materials being posted here, but they are not part of the US government, and may feel that they have some residual rights that they may try to enforce, regardless of the eventual outcome. The FSI Japanese materials, and their descendents, are currently commercially available from several sources, but I, for one, have no idea of the agreements or terms involved, or even if there are any.
 
As for Chinese Mandarin, if DLI says the material is in the public domain, I would assume that, for the most part, it is. However, my understanding is that the Chinese Mandarin Basic Course, as sold to you lucky people in the US, consists of at least nine modules, of which the first five are DLI-developed training materials, and the next four are based closely on materials still sold by Yale University Press, but reworked at DLI to fit their schedule. DLI may not care, but whether Yale is willing to see these materials on the site is an open question, as is what they might do about it.
 
The point, I suppose, is, can the owners of the site risk the wrath of some individuals or corporations that feel, rightly or wrongly, that they may have a claim on the materials that are posted. Please be careful. I don't want to spoil the party, but we have been lucky so far. I think a little caution is called for.
 
By the way, materials obtained from serving or former members of the armed forces may be different from what is commercially available from DLI. In particular, I expect it is far more complete. I would expect it to have far more military-oriented portions. I doubt that there is any classified stuff there, but I'd be careful. Also, if the materials were bought directly from DLI, are there any restrictions on re-sale, or more importantly, distribution?
 
Sorry to be such a Chicken Little.
 
TBZ


Posted By: DemiPuppet
Date Posted: 04 March 2008 at 7:02am
Big Zaboon -

First - I agree with all your statements.

Second - Professional pride and a sense of ownership is well and good. But it it doesn't count one bit in a legal sense.  If the material was legally published in the US before March 1989 without restrictions and the author did not follow the rules for establishing copyright, the material is in the public domain. No "ifs",  "ands" or "buts" about it.

I think all discussions on public domain status need to be based on legal reasoning. I agree to caution. All material should be considered copyrighted unless a sound and complete legal reason can be found to declare it in the public domain. Maybe I overly idealistic, but I think US laws work equally well both to protect the author of a work as well as those who publish it on the web. Just follow the laws. One can never be 100.00% of any copyright status (or most anything in life).  But one can certainly minimize the risks.

The Jorden material is definitely copyrighted. I can look it up on the US Copyright Office online database. I wouldn't get anywhere near it.

On the other hand, I believe the later Chinese modules are not copyrighted. They have been sold continuously by the GSA since the early 1980's and the authors did not receive a copyright. The only danger would be that the US government did not have the right to sell the material in the first place. But even in this case one could claim the copyright violation was inadvertent  and thus limit any statutory damages under Title 17, section 504.

Sigh....unfortunately I am not a lawyer and everything mentioned above needs to be taken with a grain of salt.



Posted By: Pandafair
Date Posted: 06 March 2008 at 7:16am
Sorry to have to ask this, but what do I do with the Azureus Magnet link? 


Posted By: Poetry
Date Posted: 06 March 2008 at 10:32am
Yeah, the point I've been trying to make is that while the DLI courses are still in Limbo, how are we sure that the FSI courses are public? They would still have the same issues with copyright knowledge.

It was eye-opening, intensely surprising, and very angering to me as an American taxpayer to hear that the American military though that it was "too much trouble" to keep tabs on copyright status. I asked about contracts that should have been filed in the fiscal years that they were paid in and was told that they had probably been "lost". What lost really means is that they're buried and no one ever imagined that they'd be of interest to anyone, so it's very possible that the storage that they were in was cleared and destroyed.

What that meant to me was that the true way to release the courses to the public is to create our own. Literally. Facts cannot be copyrighted. Order that they are presented and wording to explain those facts are copyrighted. Recordings can be copyrighted, but if they are created by teams that release it to public domain, then that would allow free use of the course.

I'm actually working a couple of angles here at the University, but they are delicate at this stage. Really delicate. I think it is entirely possible to get the DLI courses released on Lang.net. But I don't know if it is ever going to be possible to get a clear field for releasing them to the public. They didn't even keep records of who WORKED on the damned courses. They don't know which staff would have a stake. So, trying to contact each one and get a release is almost pointless.

And I've been unable to pursue any further leads since August, when I got my most promising lead, because of the insane work load here. I'm the sole person running one of the critical IT systems and we can't seem to find anyone who has a mote of talent to hire. I'm about to melt under the strain.

--Poetry



Posted By: Curt21
Date Posted: 07 March 2008 at 11:09pm
Originally posted by mtlewis

This is the Azureus Magnet link:

magnet:?xt=urn:btih:IYRRPVDIYWDWOLVBVJ3OSKEK4AL4SMPR

I'm pretty much a newbie as far as torrents go, so let me know if this works.

M


I'm not sure how to find this, can you give a link?


Posted By: mynameisedward
Date Posted: 09 March 2008 at 1:46am

Hi and thanks for the torrent!

I actually started downloading only a few hours after you put it out there a week ago now, but since it's huge and the transfer rates are so slow I am still only up to about 25 %. I doubt anyone else managed to get more than that either, so I wanted to ask you if you could leave it out for more than a week and preferably also up the transfer capacity, in order for at least someone else to get an entire copy and then they could seed for a while? Alternatively, if you are willing to send me the DVD:s, I could make them available on a fast connection. Contact me with a private message in that case.

It seems to be a very comprehensive course and I would hate not getting my hands on it now after having waiting for a week (my poor laptop is about to go up in flames) and struggled with MSA for over two years. :-)

For those of you who asked how to open the magnet link, go to File -> Open Torrent -> Add URL -> URL in Azureus and enter the information there. Then it should work.

Cheers.



Posted By: Curt21
Date Posted: 09 March 2008 at 10:45pm
Originally posted by mynameisedward

Hi and thanks for the torrent!

I actually started downloading only a few hours after you put it out there a week ago now, but since it's huge and the transfer rates are so slow I am still only up to about 25 %. I doubt anyone else managed to get more than that either, so I wanted to ask you if you could leave it out for more than a week and preferably also up the transfer capacity, in order for at least someone else to get an entire copy and then they could seed for a while? Alternatively, if you are willing to send me the DVD:s, I could make them available on a fast connection. Contact me with a private message in that case.

It seems to be a very comprehensive course and I would hate not getting my hands on it now after having waiting for a week (my poor laptop is about to go up in flames) and struggled with MSA for over two years. :-)

For those of you who asked how to open the magnet link, go to File -> Open Torrent -> Add URL -> URL in Azureus and enter the information there. Then it should work.

Cheers.



My problem is I don't even know how to download it.


Posted By: dustinj
Date Posted: 10 March 2008 at 12:37am
I have been unable to get it to work all week.  It says that the connection failed.

Any tips are appreciated.


Posted By: DemiPuppet
Date Posted: 10 March 2008 at 9:10pm
Well it didn't take long. The DLI MSA course is now up on ebay for $21.99

edit:
Removed ebay link


Posted By: daristani
Date Posted: 11 March 2008 at 8:23am
I saw this E-Bay course a couple of months ago, but hadn't posted about it here because I wasn't certain it was the same course.  The E-Bay seller offers a lot of US military materials, in addition to DLI and Special Forces language courses, and I in fact brought an Uzbek course (no audio) from the seller a few weeks ago.  So whether or not it is the exact same Arabic course, I'm relatively certain, given the timing, that this particular E-Bay seller did not piggyback on the work of mtlewis (whose efforts to make the materials available certainly deserve praise.)  The E-Bay seller also offers a number of FSI courses, which seem to be ones offered for free at this site, though...

 


Posted By: DemiPuppet
Date Posted: 11 March 2008 at 6:49pm
Oops - apologies to all.


Posted By: liddytime
Date Posted: 17 March 2008 at 7:12am
Topic: MSA Arabic
Posted: 2008 March 07 at 11:09pm By Curt21
Originally posted by mtlewis

This is the Azureus Magnet link:

magnet:?xt=urn:btih:IYRRPVDIYWDWOLVBVJ3OSKEK4AL4SMPR

I'm pretty much a newbie as far as torrents go, so let me know if this works.

M


I'm not sure how to find this, can you give a link?
Sorry,  but how do we access this again??  I haven't been able to find the link??
 
 


Posted By: mounthua
Date Posted: 18 March 2008 at 7:09am
Is this want you want? It's a bunch of different Arabic resources.

(Link deleted by administrator - no links to copyrighted materials allowed on this site).


Posted By: DemiPuppet
Date Posted: 18 March 2008 at 7:09pm
Those are all copyrighted.


Posted By: maguy2008
Date Posted: 15 October 2008 at 3:14am

for an Arabic online course , check http://www.arabicollege.com - www.arabicollege.com its is great and provides all what u may need about Arabic language. try the free trial days to be able to communicate with native Arabic teachers who are available 24/7 in the live class room and you dont have to download any softwares or buy cds just be online.....



Posted By: mantis
Date Posted: 15 October 2008 at 8:28am
Do we really want people posting commercial services on this site?  I don't remember what the guidelines are, but it seems to go against what this site is about.


Posted By: maguy2008
Date Posted: 16 October 2008 at 2:09am
Hi Mantis,
In fact this post cannot be considered for a commercial service since the amount that is paid is soooo small to be mentioned or discussed...


Posted By: patuco
Date Posted: 19 October 2008 at 12:35pm
What a ridiculous argument!

This is probably the same person who has tried to spam the HTLAL forum with the same links. Business must not be doing so well!


Posted By: alkeides
Date Posted: 07 November 2008 at 12:43pm
The speaker on the DLI course seems to be American (charming 1950s style accent Tongue). Is his accent good? I've heard that there was another aural Japanese course by the military given by a man fluent in Japanese but with a fairly thick accent.


Posted By: dicogno
Date Posted: 18 December 2008 at 7:43am
marcus,
i'm curious to know if you would still make the DVDs available online.  I'm struggling through a MSA course in tunis right now and thinking i'd like to do some work on my own - outside the classroom.
 
i just tried the magnet link you provided back in march, but it failed to load as -
 
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:IYRRPVDIYWDWOLVBVJ3OSKEK4AL4SMPR
thanks a ton for the offer to help; i'm really drowning right now.
 
best,
 
dicogno


Posted By: alkeides
Date Posted: 19 December 2008 at 12:32pm
Originally posted by dicogno

marcus,
i'm curious to know if you would still make the DVDs available online.  I'm struggling through a MSA course in tunis right now and thinking i'd like to do some work on my own - outside the classroom.
 
i just tried the magnet link you provided back in march, but it failed to load as -
 
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:IYRRPVDIYWDWOLVBVJ3OSKEK4AL4SMPR
thanks a ton for the offer to help; i'm really drowning right now.
 
best,
 
dicogno

dicogno, I believe http://www.onlytorrents.com/torrent/defense-language-institute-modern-standard-arabic-basic-course:19b05dc14a0b4710bdd846b759f335ede3e0b657 - this is a mirror for the torrent.

If you download it, please answer my question just above your post Big%20smile.



Print Page | Close Window